The Medal of Honor

Friday, December 5, 2014


I have always been fascinated by my dad's war stories. They are so vivid and interesting, almost as if they could be made into a movie. I had by no means idealized the war we went into, but I'd been drawn to learn more about it from his stories. So when I was contacted by a representative of Quarto Publishing in regards to the most meaningful war book (in my humble opinion), I jumped on the opportunity.

 The Medal of Honor: A History of Service Above and Beyond
The Editors of Boston Publishing Company
Published by Zenith Press
Source


Before Veterans Day of this year, I didn't really know anything about the Medal of Honor. Yes, I knew it was a special medal given to those in the military for some kind of brave act. Actually, I watched a commercial from Paul Bucha, one of the Vietnam Medal of Honor recipients and afterwards my dad and I talked about the Medal of Honor and I realized how important it was. But I wasn't aware of just how special it was until I received this book.

 The Medal of Honor details the origins of the medal, dating back to the Union in the Civil War and continues through today. A background about each war is given so the reader can see the wars through the eyes of the "boots on the ground", so to speak. Beautifully written narratives convey the events that unfolded leading up to the acts of bravery above and beyond the call of duty.

While many of the stories are very interesting, especially the story of the only woman Medal of Honor recipient, my favorite was during the Vietnam conflict. All of a sudden, the funny stories from my dad are mixed with the true tales from these Medal of Honor recipients. The stories of men being pounded with shrapnel, yet still going on to protect his fellow brothers, or the plane that braved enemy fire to safe three lives, only to realize days later the plane was never struck by a single enemy bullet.

I never did like history much while I was in school. I often wondered how I would practically use it in real life. Maybe I don't actually use the history I learned in school, but The Medal of Honor brings faces and real stories to those boring facts I learned in school. This book is full of pictures which only serve to convey the reality of the servicemen's  situations and the danger they faced.

Whether you are a Veteran, current military or family member, or just a history buff, this book will spark your interest. The heroism of the Medal of Honor recipients is inspirational. It makes me, personally, be proud to be an American and know we have so many brave men and women fighting for our great nation.



*I was given this book for free in exchange for my review. All opinions are my own.


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